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Don’t tell me who I can marry

OK… here’s another quote for you to digest and think about and comment on…

“Until we are allowed to marry everybody, we aren’t going to marry anybody. Is everybody happy? No. But there’s been no mass exodus and we didn’t implode”

Laura Marsh, a member of a Presbyterian church in Iowa said this in a newspaper article recently.

via Contemporary church battle echoes past struggles; valuable lessons overlooked – The Independent Collegian.

The lines are being drawn.  In more liberal mainline churches right now.  But get ready.  It’s coming.

How will you respond?

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2 Responses to “ “Don’t tell me who I can marry”

  1. Steve Miller says:

    This section from the article caught my eye:

    “As with many intra-church political debates, members would be better off using non-Scriptural sources, since the Bible’s many and varied stories can often be used to support both sides of an issue. Instead, obvious and observable facts should be used, such as the overwhelmingly positive results of allowing women to be ordained.”

    So basically the writer of the original article is saying throw out the Bible and then let us use human logic to decide what is best. I’m thinking that usually doesn’t go so well for people, but then again I’m using the Bible as a reference point; which I’m gathering doesn’t carry much weight for the author.

  2. PastorDT says:

    My initial response is that this author understands ordination differently than I do. When a person is licensed, ordained or commissioned it is the act of an ordaining body entrusting “authority” to the ordinand. If an individual wants to act beyond the authority entrusted by that ordaining body (whether that is a local church, synod or denomination) then the ordinand ought to have the integrity to surrender credentials to the authority to which he/she takes exception and seek credentials from another body.

    There are plenty of other ordaining bodies with which to align. If, and until, the ordaining body changes positions a minister’s integrity ought to dictate conformity. a refusal to act within current boundaries because one believes they ought to be broadened is rebellion.

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